Taming School Papers on the Fridge

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Taming School Papers on the Fridge

Easter Egger Chicken - Breed Spotlight

Easter Egger chickens are a longstanding flock favorite, from their colorful eggs to their varied looks, there's something for everyone to enjoy.

Class: Not Recognized
Origin: United States
Comb Type: Pea
Popular Colors: Varies
Standard Size: 4 Pounds (Hen) 5 Pounds (Rooster)
Egg Color: Blue, Green or Pinkish/Cream
Egg Size: Large
Production: 3 to 4 Eggs Per Week
Hardiness: Cold & Heat Hardy
Disposition: Friendly, Active, Skittish

Easter Egger chickens are a longstanding flock favorite, from their colorful eggs to their varied looks, there's something for everyone to enjoy.
Little Muff loves to scratch through leaves for a hidden treat.
These prolific layers are easy going and friendly and their piѐce de résistance is that they lay colored eggs. This varies from chicken to chicken; they can be blue, green or even pink.

Tip: It’s impossible to know what color egg your Easter Egger will lay until it lays its first egg. Although the name refers to a holiday basket of colored eggs, your Easter Egger will not lay different colored eggs each time it lays an egg. Whatever color egg it lays first is the color it will continue to lay for a lifetime. Easter Egger chickens don't switch back and forth between egg colors.

Easter Egger chickens are a longstanding flock favorite, from their colorful eggs to their varied looks, there's something for everyone to enjoy.

This is the bird you’ll most often find in hatchery catalogs as a colored egg layer. Some hatcheries accurately call their stock by the Easter Egger name. Others call their stock Araucana, Ameraucana, or Americana. Usually, their stock consists of Easter Egger chickens. True Araucana chickens are rare. Ameraucana chickens are getting more popular and some large national hatcheries do accurately carry them. Americana is just a misspelling on the part of the hatcheries.

It's important to know, Easter Eggers are not full-bred chickens. They are hybrids, meaning they are a cross between two different breeds of chickens. Hybrids can breed and reproduce, but their characteristics will not necessarily breed true or consistent. Hatcheries each have their own crosses for breeding so you really never know what you're going to get.

Since an Easter Egger's lineage is mixed and varies from breeder to breeder, this is a chicken that is normally not shown at poultry shows conforming to the American Poultry Standard. Easter Eggers are available as bantams too.

Overall, this is a hardy bird that can add a fun twist to chicken keeping. Each bird looks different and each bird lays a different color egg.  

Easter Egger chickens are a longstanding flock favorite, from their colorful eggs to their varied looks, there's something for everyone to enjoy.
Heddy was identified as an Easter Egger chicken once she started laying green eggs.

Easter Egger chickens are a longstanding flock favorite, from their colorful eggs to their varied looks, there's something for everyone to enjoy.
Big Muff has the telltale Easter Egger muffs.

Wind, Rain and a Missing Chicken

The most heart-warming thing happened to me last night. Actually, it started yesterday afternoon. It was a rainy day that was predicted to turn into  snow by evening. I had the chickens out roaming the yard, but was keeping an eye on them to make sure the weather didn't get too bad. Wouldn't you know it, right before I had to leave to pick the kids up from school, the wind and rain really started in force. I could see most of the chickens huddled under the slide on our backyard play gym. (I don't know why the were huddled there. There are many more sheltered places they could have chosen.) Anyway, I went outside in my knee-high boots to herd the chickens into their coop/run, desperately trying not to get dirty since I had no time to change before I left. I was successful getting them in, but in the wind and rain I was sure I missed someone.

As soon as I got home again, I went out to count the chickens. It was proving a difficult task since some of them were happily scratching and pecking in their run and others were inside. They kept wandering in and out so my count was never the same twice. Then, just as I was about to give up, I turned around. And at my feet was one of my brown leghorns. She was the one I had missed. She had taken shelter under the coop and decided since "mom" was home, she wanted to be put in with the flock. She was a little wet and she "bent down" as my chickens do when they want to be picked up. She turned her head up to me with her big comb flopping to one side, and I was touched.

I know we're not supposed to transfer human feelings to our animals. But, still, there's no doubt she knew I was her human and I'd take care of her. And, I was happy to do so!

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